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New Environment for "Programming with Kids"

I was psyched to see the Etoys 4.0 release last week. It's been a while since I looked at Squeakland so I took some time to play with it last weekend. I am directing a hands-on exploratory session called "Programming with Kids" this Saturday at Iowa Code Camp 4 and Etoys will definitely be the jumping off spot.

I'll be using the Etoys to Go package. This is a nicely packaged environment that runs your code portably across Windows, Mac, and Linux without installation. You can put it on a flash drive, plug it in, and go. Save your work, switch to another computer and go. Etoys to Go is a much better name than the old "One-click image" since it really has little to do with the image or how many clicks it takes.

In addition to eToys, I'll be mixing in some examples from Ducasse's great book, "Learn Programming with Robots," and from the Seaside web application framework.

I just finished testing the distribution on Windows, Mac, and Ubuntu. I'll be putting it on media to hand out at the conference and I'll post a download link here soon.

Updated:

Download the ZIP here and expand to any folder on Windows, Macintosh, or Linux:
http://bit.ly/4khd83

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